Category Archives: Poetry

It’s Been That Long, Huh?

The good thing about these long disappearances is that it means I’ve been up to good things. The bad thing is that I often neglect to share it here. If you’re ever looking for more of a day-to-day from me, my Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram pages are probably the better spots. This place is more like a hub or a repository, I suppose, though I hope to start sharing a little bit more about my professional world here in the coming months.

In the meantime, some announcements:

  • I’m now editing for Heavy Feather Review. They’re good people, and I’m very happy to be a part of a lit journal again. Why not submit some work?
  • I had two poems published up on Spork Press last fall.
  • I’ll have a poem coming out with Salt Hill in a couple months.

Anyway, that’s about it for now. But stay tuned for some more semi-frequent updates.

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What I’m Reading – June 2014 Edition

I love reading. I’d better. It’s sorta what I get paid to do. But with professional obligations to read and write, it’s sometimes difficult to remember to read and write for fun. But I’ve been making more of an effort lately, and I’ve made some headway through my substantial to-read list. Why not follow me on Goodreads to keep abreast of what’s going on with my bookshelf?

Here’s what I’ve finished lately, in no particular order.

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A New Poem Up In TAB: “The Girl Who Thought She Knew Something About Monsters”

 

 

I’m bummed I’m not taking part in National Poetry Month this year. But I have a good reason, and I’ll be sharing that with you soon, too. It’s the most overdue of all the overdue news. It’s the most hyperbolic thing ever.

In the meantime, I had a new poem up over the weekend in TAB: The Journal of Poetry & Poetics. It’s called “The Girl Who Thought She Knew Something About Monsters,” and it’s the continuing adventures of someone from The Diegesis. It’s the beginning of a new project.

Why not give it a read?

AWP14 Thoughts, and a New Poem in the Oyez Review

I’m not one to complain about time. I’m not one to fall into the “I’m just too busy” trap, mostly because I tend not to look at my obligations as burdens. Saying you’re “too busy” tends to register as a complaint. I try not to say that because, well, I really like being busy. I like doing the things that suck up my time, and I like contributing to the different creative and professional worlds in which I’ve been given an opportunity to do so.

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Let’s hear it for #AWP14! Where I’ll be, and where you should be too

Well, well, well. It’s time for AWP 2014 in my backyard of Seattle! Sure seems like this town and state in general have been rising in the ranks of national esteem lately, so the timing of this conference just feels so, so right to me. I’m very excited to be representing Cascadia poets everywhere, and although it’s always nice to travel to other locales (Boston was great last year), the hometown pride factor is pretty cool too.

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New poem in A River & Sound Review, an Honor, and Other News

When you’re a submitting writer, it’s part of the natural course of things that some weeks go better than others. Rejections usually come in bunches, and they come more frequently in the fall, when school is back in, journals are opening for submissions, and everyone is looking to get a head start on the coming year’s work load.

Having occupied many roles in the publication cycle, from the rejector to the rejectee, the acceptor to the acceptee, I am quite fascinated and appreciative of the whole process. A lot of work goes in at all ends, making the moments when it all comes together that much more worth it.

New poem in Issue 9 of River & Sound Review 

Last week, my poem “The White Between the Frames” was featured in Issue 9 of A River and Sound Review. This crew doesn’t operate too far from me, and about a year and a half ago I had the honor of winning their five minute poem challenge. The editing team was a real treat to work with on some revisions of the poem, and I have to say it was one of the most enjoyable publication processes I’ve ever been a part of.

So, if you haven’t already, please take the time to read through their latest issue, and if you don’t already, follow them on Twitter (@RSRSeattle) and Facebook. Poetry editor Michael Schmeltzer runs the show online, and he’s always ready with a good quip or a Philosoraptor-worthy question. But yeah, check ’em out and tell them what good work they do.

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Submission Season Bonus Round: Handling an Editor’s Decision

This is a fantastic overview of some basic submissions etiquette. When I managed the Bellingham Review, I’m happy to say that I rarely got any snarky or otherwise rude replies from writers that we rejected. One does stand out in my mind though: “Dear Editor Type: Those who can’t edit. Consider killing yourself.” Luckily I’m the type to find these things more humorous than anything else, but still, that kind of stuff does indeed stick with you.

Oyez Review

You’ve written, you’ve examined the marketplace, you’ve formatted your manuscript, and you’ve submitted with a great cover letter. Time goes by. Months, perhaps even close to a year. Suddenly an email shows up in your inbox or a self-addressed, stamped envelope (SASE) shows up. The moment of truth! What does it mean?

Getting a piece accepted usually becomes the high point of a day, a week,  a month, and usually editors are as excited to be taking a piece as a writer is to have it taken. In that envelope is a publication contract to read and a questionnaire to answer. What are First North American Serial Rights? What about contributors’ copies? Are you getting paid?

And what if that envelope or email is just a rejection? How do you handle it? Is the editor breaking up with you?

Rejection and acceptance are the two outcomes of a cycle of…

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